VA

COVID-19: Virginia Resources

As many of you are aware, the State of Virginia and many municipalities have taken emergency actions to slow the spread of the COVID-19. In addition to closing numerous public venues, and encouraging Virginia residents to practice social distancing, the state is also placing additional requirements on businesses to prioritize the health of employees and the public.

The information and resources provided here includes general state and federal guidance for navigating the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as specific information and resources for business owners.

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The agenda for Virginia’s entrepreneurs

Small Business Majority has created a comprehensive state policy agenda to ensure entrepreneurship is at the center of a thriving andinclusive economy in Virginia. Virginia’s nearly 750,000 small businesses employ 1.5 million people, which amounts to nearly half of the private workforce, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration.

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Small Business Majority Testifies on Limiting Short-Term Medical Plans

On January 27, 2020, Small Business Majority's Government Affairs Manager, Awesta Sarkash, testified before Virginia's Senate Committee on Commerce and Labor, in support of SB 404, health insurance; short-term limited-duration medical plans. Protecting the individual marketplace is important to entrepreneurs because many self-employed individuals and small business employees rely on the marketplace to purchase coverage.

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Small Business Majority Supports Unitary Combined Reporting in Virginia

Small Business Majority submitted a letter of support to the House Committee on Finance on HB 1109, corporate income tax; combined reporting requirements; disclosures. Currently, many multi-state corporations are able to take advantage of accounting measures to reduce their state tax bills by shifting their profits to a state that tax it at lower rates, giving them an unfair advantage over small businesses. HB 1109 would level the playing field for small businesses in Virginia that are unable to use loopholes to lower their tax bills.

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Small Business Majority Supports Refundable Tax Credit in Virginia

Small Business Majority submitted a letter of support to the House Finance Committee on HB 1435, a refundable earned income tax credit for low-income taxpayers. This bill would support entrepreneurs, as well as many low-wage small business employees, by allowing low-income individuals to claim more money. This would put money back into their pockets and help grow their businesses, as well as their customers and local economies. 

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Small Business Owner Supports Paid Family Leave in Virginia

Today, Virginia small business owner, Sandra Leibowitz, submitted a letter of support for HB 825 and SB 770, paid family and medical leave program. Implementing this state-run leave program helps small businesses to compete with larger companies by retaining employees while allowing those who need time off to take it without worrying about the cost.

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Awesta Sarkash

Awesta Sarkash manages Small Business Majority’s policy and government affairs efforts in our nation's capital and the Mid-Atlantic region.

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Please fill out this form to send a message to Awesta.

Virginia lawyer helps fellow disabled veterans through small business

During almost a decade of service with the U.S. Military, Virginia-based lawyer Matt Banks witnessed several cases in which disabled veterans were denied disability compensation for injuries or conditions sustained during their military service because they did not have the medical evidence to show that their injuries or conditions were “service-connected.” This experience coupled with his desire to be an entrepreneur inspired Matt to start a small business devoted to helping his fellow veterans.  

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Small business owners say government doesn’t understand their concerns, need help with healthcare costs and other challenges

Publisher: 
Small Business Majority
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Date: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Policymakers at all levels, from town councils to the halls of Capitol Hill, emphasize the challenges of small businesses as a key talking point during political debates. But new opinion polling in four states—Illinois, Missouri, Virginia and Wisconsin—reveals small businesses feel their government officials don’t actually understand their challenges, and they support a wide array of policies to address their needs, some of which might come as a surprise to their elected officials.

Virginia

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